4 Places to See Sculpture Art Underwater

  • Divers sinking the Apsara - a sculpture inspired by Hindu goddesses - at Jemeluk Bay,

    Divers sinking the Apsara - a sculpture inspired by Hindu goddesses - at Jemeluk Bay,

  • Weighing more than 60 tons, Ocean Atlas by British artist Jason deCaires Taylor was installed last year in Bahaman waters as the largest underwater sculpture to date.

    Weighing more than 60 tons, Ocean Atlas by British artist Jason deCaires Taylor was installed last year in Bahaman waters as the largest underwater sculpture to date.

  • Jason deCaires Taylor's work, The Silent Evolution, which consists of 400 individual statues modeled after Mexican citizens.

    Jason deCaires Taylor's work, The Silent Evolution, which consists of 400 individual statues modeled after Mexican citizens.

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From Bali to the Bahamas, these underwater sculpture attractions give divers and snorkelers a chance to immerse themselves in art.

By Gabrielle Lipton

Mexico: Museo Subacuático de Arte
Fans of British artist Jason deCaires Taylor, who created the world’s first underwater sculpture park in Grenada in 2006, will want to explore his even more expansive installation at MUSA, the subaquatic “museum” that he co-founded six years ago. Spread across two sites off the coasts of Cancún’s Isla Mujeres and Punta Nizuc, it features more than 500 of his sculptural works, all cast from pH-neutral marine concrete in an effort to promote new coral growth.

Bahamas: Sir Nicholas Nuttall Coral Reef Sculpture Garden
Opened last year off the coast of New Providence, this park is now one of the Bahamas’ top dive sites, and rightly so: it’s home to Taylor’s Ocean Atlas, the biggest sculpture of its kind yet. Alongside works by Bahamian artists, the statue—more than five meters tall and weighing over 60 tons—depicts a girl kneeling under the weight of the ocean, symbolizing future generations’ environmental burden.

Italy: Christ of the Abyss
This life-size bronze statue of Christ, arms outstretched and head tilted upward, was first submerged in 1954 in honor of the pioneering Italian scuba diver Dario Gonzatti, who drowned near this spot off the Ligurian coast eight years earlier. Sunk 17 meters deep in a cove fronting the Abbey of San Fruttuoso, Il Cristo degli Abissi is also the world’s oldest underwater sculpture, though a 2004 restoration returned the barnacle-encrusted monument to much of its original state.

Indonesia: Jemeluk Bay Underwater Gallery
Amed, Bali’s popular east-coast dive destination, has been attracting more attention recently thanks to the underwater gallery at Jemeluk Bay. A collaboration between local environmental NGOs and U.K.-based “eco art” group The Marine Foundation, the project features sculptures by Indonesian artists Wayan Winten and Eddi Prabandono, including a working post box where divers can mail waterproof postcards sold in local shops.

This article originally appeared in the June/July print issue of DestinAsian magazine (“Water Works”)

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