The New Face of ArtJog

  • A painting by Djoko Pekik, which was reportedly sold for US$336,448.

    A painting by Djoko Pekik, which was reportedly sold for US$336,448.

  • Promising Land, an installation by Entang Wiharso.

    Promising Land, an installation by Entang Wiharso.

  • Eko Nugroho's installation at this year's ArtJog is a combination of 41 paintings.

    Eko Nugroho's installation at this year's ArtJog is a combination of 41 paintings.

  • Up and coming artist Arya Pandjalu's work explores the theme of perseverance and diligence.

    Up and coming artist Arya Pandjalu's work explores the theme of perseverance and diligence.

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By Cristian Rahadiansyah

Arguably Indonesia’s largest celebration of its art scene, ArtJog is back this year with a lineup of household and up-and-coming names whose wide range of works are sure to leave an impression on both local and international audiences. Hailing from Bali, Solo, Bandung, Jakarta, and other regions across the archipelago, Indonesian artists dominate the long list of 72 participating artists this year, while a handful of others hail from countries such as Japan and Australia.

Under the theme Universal Influence, curator Bambang Toko says this year’s event seeks to demonstrate art’s influence on civilization, a concept that is also easily reflected in ArtJog organizers’ decision to relocate from the city’s Taman Budaya, its home since the program’s inception, to the Jogja National Museum this year. Prior to taking its current form as a museum, the Jogja National Museum was home to Indonesia’s oldest art institution, also known as the Indonesian Academy of Fine Arts, which was established in 1950 and today continues to produce countless local talents every year as the Indonesian Art Institution. “It’s impossible to not include ASRI when talking about the influence of art in Indonesia,” Toko says.

Akin to the previous years’ program, this year also sees ArtJog assign an artist to create a major installation to stand as the focal point of the venue. Titled Indonesia Space Science Society (ISSS), Venzha Christiawan, the selected artist, erected a 36-meter-high tower with a flying saucer on top and a signal processing device on its foot, a work Christiawan claims to be of the “astronomical art” genre.

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