Why You Should Visit the English Lake District This Spring

Hikes around its craggier hills are a must, as is a slow cruise aboard a Victorian steamer and meals showing off seasonal produce at the region’s notable fine-dining restaurants.

Lake Windermere, the largest in the English Lake District, as seen from the hill of Loughrigg Fell.

It was the sight of wild daffodils on an April stroll beside Ullswater —a ribbon-shaped glacial lake in England’s northwest corner—that inspired Romantic poet William Wordsworth to pen his most famous work in 1804. But golden blooms aren’t the only reason for making a beeline to the English Lake District come spring.

April and May are typically the sunniest and driest months of the year, making this an ideal time to explore the U.K.’s second-oldest national park and newest UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Hikes around its craggier hills (which include the highest mountain in England) are a must, as is a slow cruise aboard a Victorian steamer and meals showing off seasonal produce at the region’s notable fine-dining restaurants. And with nearby Carlisle Lake District Airport resuming passenger flights after a 26-year hiatus, access may soon become even easier.

Getting There
Scottish regional carrier Loganair is set to launch flights from London Southend Airport to Carlisle, a 30-minute drive north of Ullswater. To the south, Oxenholme Lake District Station is connected to London, Glasgow, and Edinburgh thanks to Virgin Trains.

Where to Stay 

The Forest Side (44-15394/352-50; doubles from US$338) has just 20 bedrooms occupying a 19th-century hunting lodge outside Grasmere village. Downstairs, acclaimed chef Kevin Tickle dishes up inventive fare using locally foraged ingredients.

Be Sure to Try

The 20-course seasonal tasting menu at Simon Rogan’s farm-to-table restaurant L’Enclume, which has held two Michelin stars since 2013.

This article originally appeared in the April/May 2019 print issue of DestinAsian magazine (“Field Days”).

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