Inside Aman’s New Luxury Camp in Utah

Camp Sarika by Amangiri has just 10 tented pavilions fitted with firepits and heated plunge pools.

Camp Sarika by Amangiri at sundown. (Photo: Aman)

Those who dream of a socially distant holiday in the remote American Southwest should consider staying at the 55-hectare Camp Sarika by Amangiri. Tucked away amid the sandstone mesas of the Utah desert, and a 30-minute hike (or five-minute drive) from sister resort Amangiri—whose facilities can also be enjoyed by camp guests—the just-opened property accommodates just 30 guests in total seclusion.

Camp Sarika’s name was derived from the Sanskrit term for “open space” and “sky,” and travelers can look forward to both those things through a back-to-nature experience that’s big on creature comforts. Guests here bed down in just 10 tented pavilions, which measure in at a generous 175 square meters for one-bedroom accommodation, and 262 square meters for those with two bedrooms. Each pavilion features both living and dining areas, a bar, plus an outdoor deck. Inside, walls and ceilings of canvas woven from recycled plastic bottles provide a soothing backdrop for custom-designed walnut and leather furniture. On the private terrace, heated plunge pools, firepits with fireside furniture, and telescopes encourage holidaymakers to spend more time outdoors.

Every tent at Camp Sarika has a private plunge pool. (Photo: Aman)

The lounge of a tented pavilion at Camp Sarika. (Photo: Aman)

A Camp Sarika bedroom. (Photo: Aman)

Left to right: Camp Sarika’s main pool; fireside dining at the restaurant. (Photo: Aman)

Meanwhile, the camp’s main pavilion has two spa suites, an all-day restaurant, sun deck, a swimming pool flanked by shaded daybeds, and a heated Jacuzzi. The pavilion’s design nods to the minimalistic style of Amangiri, with simple concrete blocks that appear to blend into the rock. A focal point here is Wahweap, a glass-and-marble installation by the acclaimed Asian-American artist Maya Lin, who shot to fame in 1981 after winning the national competition to design Washington, D.C.’s Vietnam Veterans Memorial (while a college student at Yale). The piece was inspired by the course of the Colorado River as it flows from nearby Lake Powell to Lake Mead.

At the restaurant, chef Anthony Marazita offers a daily changing menu focuses on Southwestern Native American cuisine; his dishes put the spotlight on indigenous produce and responsibly sourced ingredients from around the world. Spa therapies at the camp also come with a local touch, as they are inspired by traditional Navajo wellness practices. For instance, the signature two-hour Desert Calm spa journey includes a full-body exfoliation and a body wrap of red Sedona clay infused with natural botanicals.

Accessible directly from Camp Sarika’s doorstep, a private trail system covering over 16 kilometers presents multiple opportunities for desert and mountain hiking. Other adventure activities include horseback riding, canyoneering, and rock-climbing by Via Ferrata. The national parks of Zion, Grand Canyon, and Bryce are well within easy reach from the property, as are the jaw-dropping landscapes of the Navajo Nation.

More information here.

Tented pavilions at Camp Sarika. (Photo: Aman)

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