Singapore Grand Prix Concerts: Swedish House Mafia, Muse, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and More           

A recap of Singapore Grand Prix’s high-octane entertainment —from Gwen Stefani’s sassy performance to Red Hot Chili Peppers’ fiery rock concert.

A victorious moment for Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel. Photo: Singapore GP

As Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel was crowned champion at the Formula 1 Singapore Airlines Singapore Grand Prix 2019, red fireworks lit the skies. It was a victorious moment for the German race car driver, who was once again a winner following 22 races.

Meters away at the grand Padang Stage, spectators erupted in cheers both for the win and in anticipation for the race’s final concert headliner, Red Hot Chili Peppers—an exciting end to the action-packed F1 weekend.

Here’s a recap of our favorite moments:

Day 1 – Swedish House Mafia

Hypnotic visuals and sync beats led the way as the dance music group emerged on the Padang Stage to an adoring crowd of 45,000. Having made their comeback in 2018 following a five-year hiatus, DJ-producers Axwell, Sebastian Ingrosso, and Steve Angello delivered a 90-minute performance with much gusto. Marking their first performance in Asia since their reunion, the trio delved straight into chart-topping hits like Greyhouse—which was used for an Absolut Vodka commercial, Calling (Lose My Mind), and Dream Bigger. The stage setup was equally stunning, with each artist playing out of their own DJ console and drum pad, creating the effect of a massive dance party. As the show reached its climax with singalong classic Don’t You Worry Child, Axwell responded by declaring its fans “the most beautiful crowd in Asia.”

Day 2 – Gwen Stefani and Muse 

Flanked by a posse of dancers in loud leopard prints, Gwen Stefani kicked off her performance with Sweet Escape—an infectious pop hit from her second studio album of the same name. Showing off a toned physique in a sparkly crop top, the 49-year-old singer-songwriter was instantly recognizable with her trademark red lips and a blonde ponytail. Bringing a good dose of sass and energy, the three-time Grammy award winner delighted her fans with solo tracks like Just a Girl and Rich Girl, as well as No Doubt numbers like “Sunday Morning.” Midway, she also picked out a lucky fan to sign a tattoo for her arm. Without missing a beat, she made sure to belt like classics like Luxurious and Hollaback Girl, demonstrating her versatility with both ballads and pop.

The headliner of day two’s F1 festivities, the English rock band opened their set with tracks from 2018 album Simulation Theory, such as Break It To Me and Pressure. Photo: Singapore GP

Out of this world doesn’t even begin to describe Muse’s 90-minute gig, a spectacular performance guided by neon lights and electrifying rock. The headliner of day two’s F1 festivities, the English rock band opened their set with tracks from 2018 album Simulation Theory, such as Break It To Me and Pressure. Led by frontman and guitarist Matt Bellamy, who donned a futuristic pair of LED glasses and a LED-lit bomber jacket, the band thrilled the crowd with powerful guitar riffs on tracks such as Madness and Knights of Cydonia. True to their signature brand of camp, the three-man band pulled out all the stops with a bunch of female dancers who wielded smoke cannons during Propaganda.

In true rocker fashion, bassist Flea started the evening jamming to Can’t Stop from 2002 album By The Way—shirtless, sweaty, and all. Photo: Singapore GP

Day 3 – Red Hot Chili Peppers

By the looks of Red Hot Chili Peppers’ fiery 90-minute performance, 17 years was certainly worth the wait for Singaporean fans. Returning to the Lion City for the first time since its 2002 concert, the American rock stalwarts put up a show filled with instrumental rock and dance beats that got the entire crowd on their feet. In true rocker fashion, bassist Flea started the evening jamming to Can’t Stop from 2002 album By The Way—shirtless, sweaty, and all. Lead vocalist Anthony Kiedis showed off his singing chops, while drummer Chad Smith segued through Grammy-winning hits from 1999 album Californication and 2006 album Stadium Arcadium. A fitting finale, the band belted out Purple Rain, a tribute to the late multi-instrumentalist Prince. Despite visible techical errors, from a broken guitar string to volume issues, they powered through to deliver a seamless and buoyant set that will surely go down in many fans’ memory.

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