These Newly Designed In-Flight Meal Trays are Plastic-free and Edible

Design studio PriestmanGoode is currently in talks with airlines and rail companies, in the hope of bringing their bio-degradable tray concept to life, so as to reduce airline waste.

Photo: PriestmanGoode

While various airlines have made bold moves towards sustainability, one London-based design firm has taken it a step further by launching an in-flight meal tray that’s not only eco-friendly, but also edible.

As part of its “Get Onboard: Reduce. Reuse. Rethink” project, PriestmanGoode has unveiled a new meal tray crafted from used coffee grounds, as well as a side dish lid made from algae and banana leaf. The accompanying cutlery, which includes forks, spoons, and  single-use knives, are all made from coconut wood. Meanwhile, sauces are packed in edible pods made from soluble seaweed.

Photo: PriestmanGoode

In addition, a water cooler cart would be placed on the aircraft to encourage passengers to refill their bottles throughout the flight, instead of buying plastic bottles.

The design studio is currently in talks with airlines and rail companies, in hope of bringing their bio-degradable tray concept to life, so as to reduce airline waste.

Photo: PriestmanGoode

Jo Rowan, associate strategy director at PriestmanGoode, said in a press release: “While there is currently no perfect solution, this design proposal aims to encourage suppliers and airlines to rethink the meal service in a more eco-friendly manner, particularly ahead of legislation to ban single-use plastic, which in some countries is proposed for as early as 2021.”

Specializing in industrial design for the transport and aviation industries, PriestmanGoode is currently showing its “Get Onboard: Reduce. Reuse. Rethink” exhibition at the London Design Museum from now until February.

According to their website, about 5.7 million tonnes of cabin waste is generated on commercial flights each year, from single-use plastic present in meal trays and  amenities kits.

More information here.

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