Sheung Wan Neighborhood Guide

  • Little Bao’s scrumptious baked Mac and Cheese.

    Little Bao’s scrumptious baked Mac and Cheese.

  • Braised pork belly offset by a light sesame salad between two perfect bao buns.

    Braised pork belly offset by a light sesame salad between two perfect bao buns.

  • The short rib dumpling, a non-bao offering from Little Bao.

    The short rib dumpling, a non-bao offering from Little Bao.

  • One of Little Bao’s desserts, a salted ice cream with caramel sandwich.

    One of Little Bao’s desserts, a salted ice cream with caramel sandwich.

  • Shop the overflowing stalls of Cat Street. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Shop the overflowing stalls of Cat Street. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • A Cat Street stall crammed with wares. Photo by Cindy Chan

    A Cat Street stall crammed with wares. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Uncle Stezo’s stall—look for the green set-up laden with old kung-fu movie posters. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Uncle Stezo’s stall—look for the green set-up laden with old kung-fu movie posters. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Hong Kong’s Hollywood Road is lined with antique stores. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Hong Kong’s Hollywood Road is lined with antique stores. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Chocolate chip cookies done in Po’s Atelier’s style.

    Chocolate chip cookies done in Po’s Atelier’s style.

  • Loaves for sale at Po’s Atelier bakery.

    Loaves for sale at Po’s Atelier bakery.

  • Danishes on display at Po’s Atelier bakery.

    Danishes on display at Po’s Atelier bakery.

  • The spread at Po's with photography by its founder, Jonathan Leijonhufvud.

    The spread at Po's with photography by its founder, Jonathan Leijonhufvud.

  • A view from the Sheung Wan subway stop into its bustling core. Photo by Cindy Chan

    A view from the Sheung Wan subway stop into its bustling core. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Graffiti plastering the stairway up to Cat Street in Sheung Wan. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Graffiti plastering the stairway up to Cat Street in Sheung Wan. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • A barista brewing.

    A barista brewing.

  • The entry sign for Teakha. Photo by Cindy Chan

    The entry sign for Teakha. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • The entrance to Teakha, a tea house off Tai Ping Shan Road. Photo by Cindy Chan

    The entrance to Teakha, a tea house off Tai Ping Shan Road. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • The interior of XXX, a multi-use space that doubles as a gallery and a nightclub.

    The interior of XXX, a multi-use space that doubles as a gallery and a nightclub.

  • XXX kitted out for an art show.

    XXX kitted out for an art show.

  • The neon-drenched entryway down into XXX.

    The neon-drenched entryway down into XXX.

  • Sweet corn tempura.

    Sweet corn tempura.

  • Open-flame grilled chicken rules at Yardbird.

    Open-flame grilled chicken rules at Yardbird.

  • Chicken thigh yakitori from Yardbird.

    Chicken thigh yakitori from Yardbird.

  • Like a proper yakitori restaurant, Yardbird offers up any part of the chicken you would like on a stick.

    Like a proper yakitori restaurant, Yardbird offers up any part of the chicken you would like on a stick.

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Cat Street Market

Shop the overflowing stalls of Cat Street. Photo by Cindy Chan

Shop the overflowing stalls of Cat Street. Photo by Cindy Chan

Upper Lascar Row or colloquially, Cat Street, is lined with eager peddlers selling junk-store antique furniture from bygone Chinese eras, Cultural Revolution posters, and tiny faux jade trinkets. During colonial times, the street sold stolen items from “rats” (read: thieves) sold in turn by “cats” or antique dealers. Upon first glance the street appears to be a tourist trap—and it is—but if you like kitsch you’ll be sure to find something alluring in its stalls. Try Uncle Stezo’s stall—look for the green set-up laden with old kung-fu movie posters—for a collection of personal knickknacks and vintage postcards he sells depicting a Hong Kong of another time. Head up the stairs on either end of Cat Street to Hollywood Road to find more shops full of curiosities. Among them are Oi Ling (58 Hollywood Road; 852/2815-9422), a world-renowned antique dealer that is particularly adept at sourcing terracotta, and K.Y. Fine Art (142 Hollywood Road; 852/2540-4772) that specializes in ceramics and Chinese ink paintings. You could pay less for antiques in mainland China, but in Hong Kong you’ll be paying for expertise, authentication, and peace of mind.

Look for Uncle Stezo’s green stall laden with old kung-fu movie posters. Photo by Cindy Chan

Look for Uncle Stezo’s green stall laden with old kung-fu movie posters. Photo by Cindy Chan

Upper Lascar Row, Sheung Wan. Most stalls open from 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

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