Sheung Wan Neighborhood Guide

  • Little Bao’s scrumptious baked Mac and Cheese.

    Little Bao’s scrumptious baked Mac and Cheese.

  • Braised pork belly offset by a light sesame salad between two perfect bao buns.

    Braised pork belly offset by a light sesame salad between two perfect bao buns.

  • The short rib dumpling, a non-bao offering from Little Bao.

    The short rib dumpling, a non-bao offering from Little Bao.

  • One of Little Bao’s desserts, a salted ice cream with caramel sandwich.

    One of Little Bao’s desserts, a salted ice cream with caramel sandwich.

  • Shop the overflowing stalls of Cat Street. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Shop the overflowing stalls of Cat Street. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • A Cat Street stall crammed with wares. Photo by Cindy Chan

    A Cat Street stall crammed with wares. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Uncle Stezo’s stall—look for the green set-up laden with old kung-fu movie posters. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Uncle Stezo’s stall—look for the green set-up laden with old kung-fu movie posters. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Hong Kong’s Hollywood Road is lined with antique stores. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Hong Kong’s Hollywood Road is lined with antique stores. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Chocolate chip cookies done in Po’s Atelier’s style.

    Chocolate chip cookies done in Po’s Atelier’s style.

  • Loaves for sale at Po’s Atelier bakery.

    Loaves for sale at Po’s Atelier bakery.

  • Danishes on display at Po’s Atelier bakery.

    Danishes on display at Po’s Atelier bakery.

  • The spread at Po's with photography by its founder, Jonathan Leijonhufvud.

    The spread at Po's with photography by its founder, Jonathan Leijonhufvud.

  • A view from the Sheung Wan subway stop into its bustling core. Photo by Cindy Chan

    A view from the Sheung Wan subway stop into its bustling core. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • Graffiti plastering the stairway up to Cat Street in Sheung Wan. Photo by Cindy Chan

    Graffiti plastering the stairway up to Cat Street in Sheung Wan. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • A barista brewing.

    A barista brewing.

  • The entry sign for Teakha. Photo by Cindy Chan

    The entry sign for Teakha. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • The entrance to Teakha, a tea house off Tai Ping Shan Road. Photo by Cindy Chan

    The entrance to Teakha, a tea house off Tai Ping Shan Road. Photo by Cindy Chan

  • The interior of XXX, a multi-use space that doubles as a gallery and a nightclub.

    The interior of XXX, a multi-use space that doubles as a gallery and a nightclub.

  • XXX kitted out for an art show.

    XXX kitted out for an art show.

  • The neon-drenched entryway down into XXX.

    The neon-drenched entryway down into XXX.

  • Sweet corn tempura.

    Sweet corn tempura.

  • Open-flame grilled chicken rules at Yardbird.

    Open-flame grilled chicken rules at Yardbird.

  • Chicken thigh yakitori from Yardbird.

    Chicken thigh yakitori from Yardbird.

  • Like a proper yakitori restaurant, Yardbird offers up any part of the chicken you would like on a stick.

    Like a proper yakitori restaurant, Yardbird offers up any part of the chicken you would like on a stick.

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Little Bao

Braised pork belly offset by a light sesame salad between two perfect bao buns.

Braised pork belly offset by a light sesame salad between two perfect bao buns.

While not quite in Sheung Wan proper, you would do well to start your eating journey from this Chinese-fusion restaurant styled like a 1950s American diner. The pink-neon logo out front and retro-tiled floor with cha chaan teng or Hong Kong-style café dishes suggest Wong Kar-wai meets Grease. Little Bao has been around since late 2012 and began as a humble food stall in Island East Markets in Quarry Bay serving up pork bao sandwiches that brought them to fame. The focus of their brick-and-mortar enterprise centers on the Chinese baozi popularized by dim sum dishes like sweet, steamed buns filled with red bean paste or barbecue beef. Little Bao puts a fusion twist on the doughy delight, serving its sweet exteriors like a hamburger bun and filling it with options like the Sloppy Chan (vegetarian shiitake tempeh and daikon), fish tempura, and even dessert centers like green tea ice cream.  For company with your bao, try the eggplant and shiso pork tempura, which is a tangy and crunchy delight dipped in ume ponzu dip. Be sure to remember the cardinal rule of eating bao: never cut your bao—lest a cheeky waiter must inform you of your faux pas.

One of Little Bao’s desserts, a salted ice cream with caramel sandwich.

One of Little Bao’s desserts: a salted ice cream with caramel sandwich.

G/F, 66 Staunton Street, Central; 852/2194-0202; Little Bao; dinner for two from US$50

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