London’s Brixton Neighborhood Guide

  • Brixton Village's renewed wet market.

    Brixton Village's renewed wet market.

  • The cozy setting of Upstairs restaurant.

    The cozy setting of Upstairs restaurant.

  • The salmon and watercress dish.

    The salmon and watercress dish.

  • The open-air patio of Seven at Brixton.

    The open-air patio of Seven at Brixton.

  • A bartender mixes drinks at hipster-hangout Seven.

    A bartender mixes drinks at hipster-hangout Seven.

  • Federation boasts its own in-house pastry chefs.

    Federation boasts its own in-house pastry chefs.

  • Circus Brixton sells affordable artwork from local designers.

    Circus Brixton sells affordable artwork from local designers.

  • A tasting platter from Champagne + Fromage.

    A tasting platter from Champagne + Fromage.

  • Seven's Marmalady Boy, Buffalo Passion, and Ginger Beer & Basil Mojito.

    Seven's Marmalady Boy, Buffalo Passion, and Ginger Beer & Basil Mojito.

  • Federation Coffeee has an artisan roaster in a nearby market unit.

    Federation Coffeee has an artisan roaster in a nearby market unit.

  • An artisan cup of joe from Federation Coffee. Photo courtesy of Londonist

    An artisan cup of joe from Federation Coffee. Photo courtesy of Londonist

  • The entrance to Brixton Village by night.

    The entrance to Brixton Village by night.

  • Cornercopia's head chef Ian Riley lends a helping hand.

    Cornercopia's head chef Ian Riley lends a helping hand.

  • The aptly named Cornercopia's street-side venue.

    The aptly named Cornercopia's street-side venue.

  • Cornercopia's haggis croquette sources local ingredients.

    Cornercopia's haggis croquette sources local ingredients.

  • A well-loved retail store in Brixton Village.

    A well-loved retail store in Brixton Village.

  • Circus offers a selection of  vintage finds and homewares.

    Circus offers a selection of vintage finds and homewares.

  • Cheese and bubbly, what could be better?

    Cheese and bubbly, what could be better?

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Cornercopia

Cornercopia's haggis croquette sources local ingredients.

Cornercopia’s haggis croquette sources local ingredients.

Convenience stores are ten-a-penny on every British high street, but Cornercopia takes a singular approach to the modern corner shop. Chef Ian Riley and owner Anne Fairbrother channeled their passion for hyperlocal produce into an artisanal grocery store with an adjoining bistro. The larder of the shop is stuffed with homegrown produce cultivated only a mile or two away from Brixton Village, sometimes using ingredients bought from within the market itself. You’ll find everything from mango ketchup to honey collected from South London bees and chutneys and jams made from fruit foraged from nearby Brockwell Park (the tamarind chutney and damson jam are particularly good). The bistro doesn’t disappoint, either, with a menu that also leans heavily on locally sourced, foraged, or grown ingredients. Chef Riley then channels his raw materials into simple, modern British tapas that allow the freshness of the ingredients to shine through. A typical spring menu might pair pork rillettes with cornichon, beetroot goat curd and pumpkin seed salad, black pudding with in-house bacon jam, and spiced date pudding with salted caramel and ginger custard to finish off. You can wash lunch down with a fine bottle of the Gribble Bridge Ortega Dry white wine from the Biddenden vineyard, the oldest winery in Kent.

Unit 65 Brixton Village; 44-07/91-9542-233; Cornercopia; sharing plates from US$10; drinks from US$7.50

The aptly named Cornercopia's street-side venue.

The aptly named Cornercopia’s street-side venue.

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